Etymology
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yoke (n.)

Old English geoc "contrivance for fastening a pair of draft animals," earlier geoht "pair of draft animals" (especially oxen), from Proto-Germanic *yukam (source also of Old Saxon juk, Old Norse ok, Danish aag, Middle Dutch joc, Dutch juk, Old High German joh, German joch, Gothic juk "yoke"), from PIE root *yeug- "to join." Figurative sense of "heavy burden, oppression, servitude" was in Old English.

yoke (v.)

Old English geocian "to yoke, join together," from yoke (n.). Related: Yoked; yoking.

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Definitions of yoke
1
yoke (n.)
fabric comprising a fitted part at the top of a garment;
yoke (n.)
an oppressive power;
under the yoke of a tyrant
they threw off the yoke of domination
yoke (n.)
two items of the same kind;
Synonyms: couple / pair / twosome / twain / brace / span / couplet / distich / duo / duet / dyad / duad
yoke (n.)
a pair of draft animals joined by a yoke;
pulled by a yoke of oxen
yoke (n.)
support consisting of a wooden frame across the shoulders that enables a person to carry buckets hanging from each end;
yoke (n.)
a connection (like a clamp or vise) between two things so they move together;
Synonyms: coupling
yoke (n.)
stable gear that joins two draft animals at the neck so they can work together as a team;
2
yoke (v.)
become joined or linked together;
yoke (v.)
link with or as with a yoke;
yoke the oxen together
Synonyms: link
yoke (v.)
put a yoke on or join with a yoke;
From wordnet.princeton.edu

Dictionary entries near yoke

yoga

yogh

yogi

yogurt

yok

yoke

yokel

yolk

Yom Kippur

yon

yond