Etymology
Advertisement

year (n.)

Old English gear (West Saxon), ger (Anglian) "year," from Proto-Germanic *jēr "year" (source also of Old Saxon, Old High German jar, Old Norse ar, Danish aar, Old Frisian ger, Dutch jaar, German Jahr, Gothic jer "year"), from PIE *yer-o-, from root *yer- "year, season" (source also of Avestan yare (nominative singular) "year;" Greek hōra "year, season, any part of a year," also "any part of a day, hour;" Old Church Slavonic jaru, Bohemian jaro "spring;" Latin hornus "of this year;" Old Persian dušiyaram "famine," literally "bad year"). Probably originally "that which makes [a complete cycle]," and from verbal root *ei- meaning "to do, make."

Others are reading

Advertisement
Advertisement
Definitions of year

year (n.)
a period of time containing 365 (or 366) days;
in the year 1920
she is 4 years old
Synonyms: twelvemonth / yr
year (n.)
a period of time occupying a regular part of a calendar year that is used for some particular activity;
a school year
year (n.)
the period of time that it takes for a planet (as, e.g., Earth or Mars) to make a complete revolution around the sun;
a Martian year takes 687 of our days
year (n.)
a body of students who graduate together;
she was in my year at Hoehandle High
Synonyms: class
From wordnet.princeton.edu