Etymology
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wright (n.)

Old English wryhta, wrihta (Northumbrian wyrchta, Kentish werhta) "worker," variant of earlier wyhrta "maker," from wyrcan "to work" (see work (v.)). Now usually in combinations (wheelwright, playwright, etc.) or as a surname. A common West Germanic word; cognate with Old Saxon wurhito, Old Frisian wrichta, Old High German wurhto.

The metathesis of an -r- and a vowel in words from Old English also can be seen in thrash, thresh, third, thirty, bird, wrought, and nostril.

Smith was the general term for a worker in metals, and wright for one who worked in wood, and other materials. Hence, in the later English period, smith (which, in Anglo-Saxon, when used without any characteristic addition, was understood as applying more particularly to the worker in iron,) became the particular name of a blacksmith, and wright of a carpenter, as it is still in Scotland. [Thomas Wright, "Anglo-Saxon and Old English Vocabularies," 1884]

updated on February 27, 2022

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Definitions of wright from WordNet
1
wright (n.)
someone who makes or repairs something (usually used in combination);
2
Wright (n.)
United States writer of detective novels (1888-1939);
Synonyms: Willard Huntington Wright / S. S. Van Dine
Wright (n.)
United States writer whose work is concerned with the oppression of African Americans (1908-1960);
Synonyms: Richard Wright
Wright (n.)
United States aviation pioneer who (with his brother Orville Wright) invented the airplane (1867-1912);
Synonyms: Wilbur Wright
Wright (n.)
United States aviation pioneer who (with his brother Wilbur Wright) invented the airplane (1871-1948);
Synonyms: Orville Wright
Wright (n.)
influential United States architect (1869-1959);
Synonyms: Frank Lloyd Wright
Wright (n.)
United States early feminist (born in Scotland) (1795-1852);
Synonyms: Frances Wright / Fanny Wright
Etymologies are not definitions. From wordnet.princeton.edu, not affiliated with etymonline.