Etymology
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wound (n.)

Old English wund "hurt, injury, ulcer," from Proto-Germanic *wuntho (source also of Old Saxon wunda, Old Norse und, Old Frisian wunde, Old High German wunta, German wunde "wound"), perhaps from PIE root *wen- (2) "to beat, wound."

wound (v.)

Old English wundian "to wound," from the source of wound (n.). Cognate with Old Frisian wundia, Middle Dutch and Dutch wonden, Old High German wunton, German verwunden, Gothic gawundon. Figurative use, of feelings, etc., from c. 1200. Related: Wounded; wounding.

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Definitions of wound
1
wound (n.)
an injury to living tissue (especially an injury involving a cut or break in the skin);
Synonyms: lesion
wound (n.)
a casualty to military personnel resulting from combat;
Synonyms: injury / combat injury
wound (n.)
a figurative injury (to your feelings or pride); "The right reader of a good poem can tell the moment it strikes him that he has taken an immortal wound--that he will never get over it"--Robert Frost;
deep in her breast lives the silent wound
he feared that mentioning it might reopen the wound
wound (n.)
the act of inflicting a wound;
Synonyms: wounding
2
wound (v.)
cause injuries or bodily harm to;
Synonyms: injure
wound (v.)
hurt the feelings of;
Synonyms: hurt / injure / bruise / offend / spite
3
wound (adj.)
put in a coil;
From wordnet.princeton.edu