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worry (v.)

c. 1300, wirien, "to slay, kill or injure by biting and shaking the throat" (as a dog or wolf does), from Old English wyrgan "to strangle," from Proto-Germanic *wurgjan (source also of Middle Dutch worghen, Dutch worgen, Old High German wurgen, German würgen "to strangle," Old Norse virgill "rope"), from *wergh-, from PIE root *wer- (2) "to turn, bend."

The "strangle" sense generally was obsolete in English after c. 1600; the figurative meaning "to annoy, bother, vex" is by c. 1400. Meaning "to cause mental distress or trouble" is attested from 1822; intransitive sense of "to feel anxiety or mental trouble" is attested by 1860.  Related: Worried; worrier; worrying. 

Origin and meaning of worry

worry (n.)

"anxiety arising from cares and troubles," 1804, from worry (v.).

Origin and meaning of worry

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Definitions of worry
1
worry (v.)
be worried, concerned, anxious, troubled, or uneasy;
I worry about my job
worry (v.)
be concerned with;
I worry about my grades
Synonyms: care
worry (v.)
disturb the peace of mind of; afflict with mental agitation or distress;
I cannot sleep--my daughter's health is worrying me
Synonyms: vex
worry (v.)
be on the mind of;
I worry about the second Germanic consonant shift
Synonyms: concern / interest / occupy
worry (v.)
lacerate by biting;
the dog worried his bone
worry (v.)
touch or rub constantly;
The old man worried his beads
2
worry (n.)
something or someone that causes anxiety; a source of unhappiness;
it's a major worry
Synonyms: concern / headache / vexation
worry (n.)
a strong feeling of anxiety;
his worry over the prospect of being fired
it is not work but worry that kills
Synonyms: trouble
From wordnet.princeton.edu