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worm (n.)

Old English wurm, variant of wyrm "serpent, snake, dragon, reptile," also in later Old English "earthworm," from Proto-Germanic *wurmiz (source also of Old Saxon, Old High German, German wurm, Old Frisian and Dutch worm, Old Norse ormr, Gothic waurms "serpent, worm"), from PIE *wrmi- "worm" (source also of Greek rhomos, Latin vermis "worm," Old Russian vermie "insects," Lithuanian varmas "insect, gnat"), from PIE *wrmi- "worm," from root *wer- (2) "to turn, bend."

The ancient category of these was much more extensive than the modern, scientific, one and included serpents, scorpions, maggots, and the supposed causes of certain diseases. For substitution of -o- for -u-, see come. As an insult meaning "abject, miserable person" it dates from Old English. Worms "any disease arising from the presence of parasitic worms" is from late Old English. Can of worms figurative for "difficult problem" is from 1951, from the literal can of worms a fisherman might bring with him, on the image of something all tangled up.

worm (v.)

"to move like a worm," c. 1600, from worm (n.). In figurative senses attested from 1620s, suggesting patient, sinuous progress. Meaning "to free from worms" is from 1620s. Related: Wormed; worming.

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Definitions of worm from WordNet
1
worm (n.)
any of numerous relatively small elongated soft-bodied animals especially of the phyla Annelida and Chaetognatha and Nematoda and Nemertea and Platyhelminthes; also many insect larvae;
worm (n.)
a person who has a nasty or unethical character undeserving of respect;
Synonyms: louse / insect / dirt ball
worm (n.)
a software program capable of reproducing itself that can spread from one computer to the next over a network;
worms take advantage of automatic file sending and receiving features found on many computers
worm (n.)
screw thread on a gear with the teeth of a worm wheel or rack;
2
worm (v.)
to move in a twisting or contorted motion, (especially when struggling);
Synonyms: writhe / wrestle / wriggle / squirm / twist
From wordnet.princeton.edu