Etymology
Advertisement

whisk (n.)

late 14c., "quick stroke, sweeping movement," probably from Old Norse visk "wisp of hay, something to sweep with," from Proto-Germanic *wisk- "move quickly" (source also of Danish visk "broom," Middle Dutch wisch, Dutch wis, Old High German wisc, German wisch "wisp, brush"), from PIE root *weis- "to turn, twist" (source also of Sanskrit veskah "noose," Czech vechet "a wisp of straw," Old English wiscian "to plait," weoxian "to clean" with a whisk or brush). Unetymological spelling with wh- is from 1570s. Meaning "implement for beating eggs, etc." first recorded 1660s.

whisk (v.)

late 15c., "move with a rapid sweeping motion" (intransitive), from a Scandinavian source (compare Danish viske "to wipe, rub, sponge," Norwegian, Swedish viska "wipe," also "wag the tail"), from the source of whisk (n.). Transitive sense is from 1510s; meaning "to brush or sweep (something) lightly over a surface" is from 1620s. Related: Whisked; whisking.

Others are reading

Advertisement
Advertisement
Definitions of whisk
1
whisk (v.)
move somewhere quickly;
The President was whisked away in his limo
whisk (v.)
move quickly and nimbly;
He whisked into the house
whisk (v.)
brush or wipe off lightly;
Synonyms: whisk off
whisk (v.)
whip with or as if with a wire whisk;
whisk the eggs
Synonyms: whip
2
whisk (n.)
a mixer incorporating a coil of wires; used for whipping eggs or cream;
whisk (n.)
a small short-handled broom used to brush clothes;
Synonyms: whisk broom
From wordnet.princeton.edu