Etymology
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Words related to wharf

Antwerp 
port city in Belgium, French Anvers, from a Germanic compound of *anda "at" + *werpum "wharf" (see wharf). Folk etymology connects the first word with hand.
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carpus (n.)
"wrist, wrist-joint, bones of the wrist," 1670s, from Modern Latin carpus, from Greek karpos "wrist," which is probably related to Germanic verbs for "turn, revolve" (see wharf).
varve (n.)
"annual deposit of silt in a lake bed," 1912, from Swedish varv "turn, layer," related to Old Norse hverfa, Old English hwerfan "to turn round" (see wharf).
wharfinger (n.)
"operator or manager of a wharf," 1550s, from wharfage "provision or accommodation at wharves" (mid-15c.), from wharf + agent noun suffix -er (1) + unetymological -n- as in messenger.
whir (v.)
c. 1400, Scottish, "fling, hurl," probably from Old Norse hvirfla, frequentative of hverfa "to turn" (see wharf). Compare Danish hvirvle, Dutch wervelen, German wirbeln "to whirl." Related: Whirred; whirring.
whirl (v.)
c. 1300, probably from Old Norse hvirfla "to go round, spin," related to hvirfill "circle, ring, crown," and to Old English hweorfan "to turn" (see wharf). Related: Whirled; whirling. Whirlybird "helicopter" is from 1951.