Etymology
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web (n.)

Old English webb "woven fabric, woven work, tapestry," from Proto-Germanic *wabjam "fabric, web" (source also of Old Saxon webbi, Old Norse vefr, Dutch webbe, Old High German weppi, German gewebe "web"), from PIE *(h)uebh- "to weave" (see weave (v.)).

Meaning "spider's web" is first recorded early 13c. Applied to the membranes between the toes of ducks and other aquatic birds from 1570s. Internet sense is from 1992, shortened from World Wide Web (1990). Web browser, web page both also attested 1990.

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Definitions of web
1
web (n.)
an intricate network suggesting something that was formed by weaving or interweaving;
the trees cast a delicate web of shadows over the lawn
web (n.)
an intricate trap that entangles or ensnares its victim;
Synonyms: entanglement
web (n.)
the flattened weblike part of a feather consisting of a series of barbs on either side of the shaft;
Synonyms: vane
web (n.)
an interconnected system of things or people;
tangled in a web of cloth
Synonyms: network
web (n.)
computer network consisting of a collection of internet sites that offer text and graphics and sound and animation resources through the hypertext transfer protocol;
Synonyms: World Wide Web / www
web (n.)
a fabric (especially a fabric in the process of being woven);
web (n.)
membrane connecting the toes of some aquatic birds and mammals;
2
web (v.)
construct or form a web, as if by weaving;
Synonyms: net
From wordnet.princeton.edu