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wean (v.)

"train (an infant or animal) to forego suckling," c. 1200, from Old English wenian "to accustom, habituate," from Proto-Germanic *wanjan (source also of Old Norse venja, Dutch wennen, Old High German giwennan, German gewöhnen "to accustom"), from PIE *won-eyo-, causative form of root *wen- (1) "to desire, strive for."

The sense of "accustom a child to not suckling from the breast" in Old English generally was expressed by gewenian or awenian, which has a sense of "unaccustom" (compare German abgewöhnen, entwöhnen "to wean," literally "to unaccustom"). The modern word might be one of these with the prefix worn off, or it might be wenian in a specialized sense of "accustom to a new diet." Figurative extension to any pursuit or habit is from 1520s.

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Definitions of wean

wean (v.)
gradually deprive (infants and young mammals) of mother's milk;
The kitten was weaned and fed by its owner with a bottle
she weaned her baby when he was 3 months old and started him on powdered milk
Synonyms: ablactate
wean (v.)
detach the affections of;
From wordnet.princeton.edu