Etymology
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Words related to wash

*wed- (1)
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "water; wet."

It forms all or part of: abound; anhydrous; carbohydrate; clepsydra; dropsy; hydra; hydrangea; hydrant; hydrargyrum; hydrate; hydraulic; hydro-; hydrogen; hydrophobia; hydrous; Hydrus; inundate; inundation; kirsch-wasser; nutria; otter; redound; redundant; surround; undine; undulant; undulate; undulation; vodka; wash; water (n.1); wet; whiskey; winter.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Hittite watar, Sanskrit udrah, Greek hydor, Old Church Slavonic and Russian voda, Lithuanian vanduo, Old Prussian wundan, Gaelic uisge "water;" Latin unda "wave;" Old English wæter, Old High German wazzar, Gothic wato "water."
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washing (n.)
Old English wæscing "action of washing clothes," verbal noun from wash (v.). Meaning "clothes washed at one time" is from 1854. Washing machine attested from 1754.
backwash (n.)

1861, "motion of a receding wave;" see back (adv.) + wash (v.). As "residue in a glass or bottle of beer after drinking most of it," by 1897.

outwash (n.)

"material carried from a glacier by meltwater," 1894, from out- + wash (v.).

swash (v.)
1580s, "spill or splash (water) about," 1530s, possibly from wash (v.) with an intensifying s-, or imitative of the sound of water dashing against solid objects. Related: Swashed; swashing.
unwashed (adj.)
late 14c., from un- (1) "not" + past participle of wash (v.). Replaced Middle English unwashen, from Old English unwæscen. Noun sense of "the lower class" is attested from 1830.
washable (adj.)
1620s, from wash (v.) + -able. Related: Washables (n.), 1892.
washboard (n.)
also wash-board, clothes-cleaning device, 1882, from wash (v.) + board (n.1). As a percussion instrument, attested from 1925; in reference to abdominal muscles, recorded from 1950 in boxing jargon. Earlier such muscle development was described as checkerboard (1893).
wash-cloth (n.)
1861, from wash (v.) + cloth (n.).
washdown (n.)
also wash-down, 1949, from verbal phrase, from wash (v.) + down (adv.).