Etymology
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wallow (v.)

Old English wealwian "to roll," from West Germanic *walwon, from PIE root *wel- (3) "to turn, revolve." Figurative sense of "to plunge and remain in some state or condition" is attested from early 13c. Related: Wallowed; wallowing. The noun is recorded from 1590s as "act of rolling;" 1841 as "place where an animal wallows."

updated on April 10, 2017

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Definitions of wallow from WordNet
1
wallow (v.)
devote oneself entirely to something; indulge in to an immoderate degree, usually with pleasure;
wallow in your sorrows
wallow (v.)
roll around;
pigs were wallowing in the mud
Synonyms: welter
wallow (v.)
rise up as if in waves;
Synonyms: billow
wallow (v.)
be ecstatic with joy;
Synonyms: rejoice / triumph
wallow (v.)
delight greatly in;
wallow in your success!
2
wallow (n.)
a puddle where animals go to wallow;
wallow (n.)
an indolent or clumsy rolling about;
a good wallow in the water
Etymologies are not definitions. From wordnet.princeton.edu, not affiliated with etymonline.