Etymology
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Words related to wade

invasion (n.)
Origin and meaning of invasion

mid-15c., invasioun, "an assault, attack, act of entering a country or territory as an enemy," from Old French invasion "invasion, attack, assault" (12c.), from Late Latin invasionem (nominative invasio) "an attack, invasion," noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin invadere "to go, come, or get into; enter violently, penetrate into as an enemy, assail, assault, make an attack on," from in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + vadere "to go, to walk, go hastily," from PIE root *wadh- (2) "to go" (source also of Old English wadan "to go," Latin vadum "ford;" see wade (v.)).

In extended sense, of diseases, "a harmful incursion of any kind;" with reference to rights, etc., "infringement by intrusion, encroachment by entering into or taking away what belongs to another."

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vamoose (v.)

"to decamp, be off," 1834, from Spanish vamos "let us go," from Latin vadamus, first person plural indicative or subjunctive of vadere "to go, to walk, go hastily," from PIE root *wadh- (2) "to go" (source also of Old English wadan "to go," Latin vadum "ford;" see wade (v.)).

waddle (v.)
"to walk with short steps, swaying from side to side; to walk as a duck does," 1590s, frequentative of wade. Related: Waddled; waddling. The noun is recorded from 1690s.
waders (n.)
"waterproof high boots," 1841, plural agent noun from wade.