Etymology
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veto (n.)

1620s, from Latin veto, literally "I forbid," first person singular present indicative of vetare "forbid, prohibit, oppose, hinder," of unknown origin. In ancient Rome, the "technical term for protest interposed by a tribune of the people against any measure of the Senate or of the magistrates" [Lewis].

veto (v.)

1706, from veto (n.). Related: Vetoed; vetoing.

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Definitions of veto
1
veto (v.)
vote against; refuse to endorse; refuse to assent;
The President vetoed the bill
Synonyms: blackball / negative
veto (v.)
command against;
Mother vetoed the trip to the chocolate store
2
veto (n.)
a vote that blocks a decision;
veto (n.)
the power or right to prohibit or reject a proposed or intended act (especially the power of a chief executive to reject a bill passed by the legislature);
From wordnet.princeton.edu