Etymology
Advertisement

vein (n.)

c. 1300, from Old French veine "vein, artery, pulse" (12c.), from Latin vena "a blood vessel," also "a water course, a vein of metal, a person's natural ability or interest," of unknown origin. The mining sense is attested in English from late 14c. (Greek phleps "vein" had the same secondary sense). Figurative sense of "strain or intermixture" (of some quality) is recorded from 1560s; that of "a humor or mood, natural tendency" is first recorded 1570s.

Others are reading

Advertisement
Advertisement
Definitions of vein
1
vein (n.)
a blood vessel that carries blood from the capillaries toward the heart;
all veins except the pulmonary vein carry unaerated blood
Synonyms: vena / venous blood vessel
vein (n.)
a distinctive style or manner;
he continued in this vein for several minutes
vein (n.)
any of the vascular bundles or ribs that form the branching framework of conducting and supporting tissues in a leaf or other plant organ;
Synonyms: nervure
vein (n.)
a layer of ore between layers of rock;
Synonyms: mineral vein
vein (n.)
one of the horny ribs that stiffen and support the wing of an insect;
Synonyms: nervure
2
vein (v.)
make a veinlike pattern;
From wordnet.princeton.edu