Etymology
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Words related to urine

udder (n.)
Old English udder "milk gland of a cow, goat, etc.," from Proto-Germanic *udr- (source also of Old Frisian uder, Middle Dutch uyder, Dutch uijer, Old High German utar, German Euter, and, with unexplained change of consonant, Old Norse jugr), from PIE *eue-dh-r "udder" (source also of Sanskrit udhar, Greek outhar, Latin uber "udder, breast").
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anuria (n.)
"absence of urination," 1838, medical Latin, from Greek an- "not, without" (see an- (1)) + ouron "urine" (see urine) + abstract noun ending -ia.
diuresis (n.)

"excessive secretion of urine," 1680s, medical Latin, from Greek diourein "to urinate," from dia "through" (see dia-) + ourein "urinate," from ouron (see urine) + -esis.

diuretic 

as an adjective, "inducing or promoting urination;" as a noun, "medicine that promotes urination;" c. 1400 diuretik (adjective and noun), from Old French diuretique, from Late Latin diureticus, from Greek diouretikos "prompting urine," from diourein "urinate," from dia "through" (see dia-) + ourein "urinate," from ouron (see urine).

enuresis (n.)
minor urinary incontinence, 1800, medical Latin, from Greek enourein "to urinate in," from en "in" (see en- (2)) + ourein "to urinate," from ouron (see urine).
oliguria (n.)

in pathology, "scantiness of urine," 1843, from oligo- "small, little," + -uria, from Greek ouron "urine" (see urine).

proteinuria 

"presence of abnormal levels of protein in the urine," 1911, Modern Latin, from French protéinurie; see protein + urine + abstract noun ending -ia.

purine (n.)

basic crystalline substance found in uric acid, caffeine, adenine, etc., 1898, from German purin (Fischer), said to be from Latin purum, neuter of purus "clean, pure" (see pure) + Modern Latin uricum "uric acid" (see urine) + chemical suffix -ine (2). Related: Purinergic.

pyuria (n.)

"presence of pus in the urine," 1787, from medical Latin (by 1760s), from pyo- + -uria (see urine).

urea (n.)
compound found in the urine of animals, 1806, Latinized from French urée (1803), from Greek ouron "urine" (see urine).