Etymology
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Words related to unity

*oi-no- 
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "one, unique."

It forms all or part of: a (1) indefinite article; alone; an; Angus; anon; atone; any; eleven; inch (n.1) "linear measure, one-twelfth of a foot;" lone; lonely; non-; none; null; once; one; ounce (n.1) unit of weight; quincunx; triune; unanimous; unary; une; uni-; Uniate; unilateral; uncial; unicorn; union; unique; unison; unite; unity; universal; universe; university; zollverein.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Greek oinos "ace (on dice);" Latin unus "one;" Old Persian aivam; Old Church Slavonic -inu, ino-; Lithuanian vienas; Old Irish oin; Breton un "one;" Old English an, German ein, Gothic ains "one."
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disunity (n.)

"want of unity, state of separation; absence of accord," 1630s, from dis- + unity.

unit (n.)
1560s, "single number regarded as an undivided whole," alteration of unity on the basis of digit. Popularized in John Dee's English translation of Euclid, to express Greek monas (Dee says unity formerly was used in this sense). Meaning "single thing regarded as a member of a group" is attested from 1640s. Extended sense of "a quantity adopted as a standard of measure" is from 1738. Sense of "group of wards in a hospital" is attested from 1893.
unitarian (n.)
1680s, "one who rejects the doctrine of the Trinity," from Modern Latin unitarius (1650s), from Latin unitas (see unity) + -ian. Applied to Muslims and other non-Christian monotheists, but especially (and with a capital -u-) of a Christian body originally founded upon the doctrine of unipersonality. The American Unitarian Association formed in 1825. As an adjective from 1680s.