Etymology
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uncouth (adj.)

Old English uncuð "unknown, strange, unusual; uncertain, unfamiliar; unfriendly, unkind, rough," from un- (1) "not" + cuð "known, well-known," past participle of cunnan "to know" (see can (v.1)), from PIE root *gno- "to know." Meaning "strange, crude, clumsy" is first recorded 1510s. The compound (and the thing it describes) widespread in IE languages, such as Latin ignorantem, Old Norse ukuðr, Gothic unkunþs, Sanskrit ajnatah, Armenian ancanaut', Greek agnotos, Old Irish ingnad "unknown."

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Definitions of uncouth

uncouth (adj.)
lacking refinement or cultivation or taste;
an untutored and uncouth human being
an uncouth soldier--a real tough guy
Synonyms: coarse / common / rough-cut / vulgar
From wordnet.princeton.edu