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twist (n.)

mid-14c., "flat part of a hinge" (now obsolete), probably from Old English -twist "divided object; fork; rope" (as in mæsttwist "mast rope, stay;" candeltwist "wick"), from Proto-Germanic *twis-, from PIE root *dwo- "two." Original senses suggest "dividing in two" (source also of cognate Old Norse tvistra "to divide, separate," Gothic twis- "in two, asunder," Dutch twist, German zwist "quarrel, discord," though these senses have no equivalent in English), but later ones are of "combining two into one," hence the original sense of the word may be "rope made of two strands."

Meaning "thread or cord composed of two or more fibers" is recorded from 1550s. Meaning "act or action of turning on an axis" is attested from 1570s. Sense of "beverage consisting of two or more liquors" is first attested c. 1700. Meaning "thick cord of tobacco" is from 1791. Meaning "curled piece of lemon, etc., used to flavor a drink" is recorded from 1958. Sense of "unexpected plot development" is from 1941.

The popular rock 'n' roll dance craze is from 1961, so called from the motion involved, but twist was used to describe popular dances in 1894 and again in the 1920s. To get one's knickers in a twist "be unduly agitated" is British slang first attested 1971.

twist (v.)

c. 1200 (implied in past tense form twaste), "to wring," from twist (n.). Sense of "to spin two or more strands of yarn into thread" is attested from late 15c. Meaning "to move in a winding fashion" is recorded from 1630s. To twist the lion's tail was U.S. slang (1895) for "to provoke British feeling" (the lion being the symbol of Britain). To twist (someone's) arm in the figurative sense of "pressure (to do something)" is from 1945. Related: Twisted; twisting.

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Definitions of twist from WordNet
1
twist (n.)
an unforeseen development;
Synonyms: turn / turn of events
twist (n.)
an interpretation of a text or action;
Synonyms: construction
twist (n.)
any clever maneuver;
Synonyms: device / gimmick
twist (n.)
the act of rotating rapidly;
it broke off after much twisting
Synonyms: spin / twirl / twisting / whirl
twist (n.)
a sharp strain on muscles or ligaments;
Synonyms: wrench / pull
twist (n.)
a sharp bend in a line produced when a line having a loop is pulled tight;
Synonyms: kink / twirl
twist (n.)
a circular segment of a curve;
Synonyms: bend / crook / turn
twist (n.)
a miniature whirlpool or whirlwind resulting when the current of a fluid doubles back on itself;
Synonyms: eddy
twist (n.)
a jerky pulling movement;
Synonyms: wrench
twist (n.)
a hairdo formed by braiding or twisting the hair;
Synonyms: braid / plait / tress
twist (n.)
social dancing in which couples vigorously twist their hips and arms in time to the music; was popular in the 1960s;
they liked to dance the twist
twist (n.)
the act of winding or twisting;
Synonyms: wind / winding
twist (n.)
turning or twisting around (in place);
with a quick twist of his head he surveyed the room
Synonyms: turn
2
twist (v.)
to move in a twisting or contorted motion, (especially when struggling);
Synonyms: writhe / wrestle / wriggle / worm / squirm
twist (v.)
cause (a plastic object) to assume a crooked or angular form;
twist the dough into a braid
Synonyms: flex / bend / deform / turn
twist (v.)
turn in the opposite direction;
twist one's head
twist (v.)
form into a spiral shape;
The cord is all twisted
Synonyms: twine / distort
twist (v.)
form into twists;
twist (v.)
extend in curves and turns;
the path twisted through the forest
Synonyms: wind / curve
twist (v.)
do the twist;
twist (v.)
twist or pull violently or suddenly, especially so as to remove (something) from that to which it is attached or from where it originates;
Synonyms: wrench
twist (v.)
practice sophistry; change the meaning of or be vague about in order to mislead or deceive;
Don't twist my words
Synonyms: twist around / pervert / convolute / sophisticate
twist (v.)
twist suddenly so as to sprain;
The wrestler twisted his shoulder
Synonyms: sprain / wrench / turn / wrick / rick
From wordnet.princeton.edu