Etymology
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Words related to turk

Turkey 
country name, late 14c., from Medieval Latin Turchia, from Turcus (see Turk) + -ia.
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Turkish (adj.)
1540s, from Turk (n.) + -ish. As a noun, "the Turkish language," from 1718.
Turkoman 
also Turcoman, c. 1600, from Medieval Latin Turcomannus, from Persian Turkman, literally "Turk-like," from Turk + -man "like."
Turkophile 
also Turcophile, 1876, from combining form of Turk + -phile.
young (adj.)

Old English geong "youthful, young; recent, new, fresh," from Proto-Germanic *junga- (source also of Old Saxon and Old Frisian jung, Old Norse ungr, Middle Dutch jonc, Dutch jong, Old High German and German jung, Gothic juggs), from PIE *yuwn-ko-, suffixed form of root *yeu- "vital force, youthful vigor" (source also of Sanskrit yuvan- "young; young man;" Avestan yuuanem, yunam "youth," yoista- "youngest;" Latin juvenis "young," iunior "younger, more young;" Lithuanian jaunas, Old Church Slavonic junu, Russian junyj "young," Old Irish oac, Welsh ieuanc "young").

From c. 1830-1850, Young France, Young Italy, etc., were loosely applied to "republican agitators" in various monarchies; also, especially in Young England, Young America, used generally for "typical young person of the nation." For Young Turk, see Turk.