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tube (n.)

1610s, from French tube (15c.), from Latin tubus "tube, pipe," a word of unknown origin. The London subway was christened the Twopenny Tube (H.D. Browne, in the "Londoner" of June 30, 1900) before it even opened; tube for "cylindrical railway tunnel" is attested from 1847. The meaning "TV as a medium" is from 1959, short for cathode ray tube or picture tube. Tube top as a women's clothing style is attested from 1972. Tube steak is attested from 1963 as "frankfurter," slang meaning "penis" is recorded by mid-1980s.

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Definitions of tube from WordNet
1
tube (n.)
conduit consisting of a long hollow object (usually cylindrical) used to hold and conduct objects or liquids or gases;
Synonyms: tubing
tube (n.)
electronic device consisting of a system of electrodes arranged in an evacuated glass or metal envelope;
Synonyms: vacuum tube / thermionic vacuum tube / thermionic tube / electron tube / thermionic valve
tube (n.)
a hollow cylindrical shape;
Synonyms: pipe
tube (n.)
(anatomy) any hollow cylindrical body structure;
Synonyms: tube-shaped structure
tube (n.)
an electric railway operating below the surface of the ground (usually in a city);
in Paris the subway system is called the `metro' and in London it is called the `tube' or the `underground'
Synonyms: metro / underground / subway system / subway
2
tube (v.)
provide with a tube or insert a tube into;
tube (v.)
convey in a tube;
inside Paris, they used to tube mail
tube (v.)
ride or float on an inflated tube;
We tubed down the river on a hot summer day
tube (v.)
place or enclose in a tube;
From wordnet.princeton.edu