Etymology
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truss (n.)

c. 1200, "collection of things bound together," from Old French trousse, torse "parcel, package, bundle," of uncertain origin, perhaps from Vulgar Latin *torciare "to twist," from Late Latin torquere "to twist" (from PIE root *terkw- "to twist"). Meaning "surgical appliance to support a rupture, etc." first attested 1540s. Sense of "framework for supporting a roof or bridge" is first recorded 1650s.

truss (v.)

c. 1200, "to load, load up," from Anglo-French trusser, Old French trusser, torser "to load, fill, pack, fasten" (11c.), from Old French trousse, torse (see truss (n.)). Related: Trussed; trussing.

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Definitions of truss
1
truss (v.)
tie the wings and legs of a bird before cooking it;
truss (v.)
secure with or as if with ropes;
Synonyms: tie down / tie up / bind
truss (v.)
support structurally;
trussed bridges
truss the roofs
2
truss (n.)
(medicine) a bandage consisting of a pad and belt; worn to hold a hernia in place by pressure;
truss (n.)
a framework of beams (rafters, posts, struts) forming a rigid structure that supports a roof or bridge or other structure;
truss (n.)
(architecture) a triangular bracket of brick or stone (usually of slight extent);
Synonyms: corbel
From wordnet.princeton.edu