Etymology
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trough (n.)

Old English trog "wooden vessel, tray, hollow vessel, canoe," from Proto-Germanic *trugaz (source also of Old Frisian, Old Saxon, Old Norse trog, Middle Dutch troch, Dutch trog, Old High German troc, German trog), from PIE *dru-ko-, from root *deru- "be firm, solid, steadfast," with specialized senses "wood, tree" and derivatives referring to objects made of wood. Originally pronounced in English with a hard -gh- (as in Scottish loch); pronunciation shifted to "-ff," but spelling remained.

updated on April 27, 2017

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Definitions of trough from WordNet

trough (n.)
a narrow depression (as in the earth or between ocean waves or in the ocean bed);
trough (n.)
a channel along the eaves or on the roof; collects and carries away rainwater;
Synonyms: gutter
trough (n.)
a concave shape with an open top;
Synonyms: bowl
trough (n.)
a treasury for government funds;
Synonyms: public treasury / till
trough (n.)
a long narrow shallow receptacle;
trough (n.)
a container (usually in a barn or stable) from which cattle or horses feed;
Synonyms: manger
From wordnet.princeton.edu, not affiliated with etymonline.