Etymology
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traverse (v.)

early 14c., "pass across, over, or through," from Old French traverser "to cross, place across" (11c.), from Vulgar Latin *traversare, from Latin transversare "to cross, throw across," from Latin transversus "turn across" (see transverse). As an adjective from early 15c. Related: Traversed; traversing.

traverse (n.)

"act of passing through a gate, crossing a bridge, etc.," mid-14c., from Old French travers, from traverser (see traverse (v.)). Meaning "a passage by which one may traverse" is recorded from 1670s. Military fortification sense of "barrier, barricade" is recorded from 1590s.

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Definitions of traverse
1
traverse (n.)
a horizontal crosspiece across a window or separating a door from a window over it;
Synonyms: transom
traverse (n.)
taking a zigzag path on skis;
Synonyms: traversal
traverse (n.)
travel across;
Synonyms: traversal
traverse (n.)
a horizontal beam that extends across something;
Synonyms: trave / crossbeam / crosspiece
2
traverse (v.)
travel across or pass over;
Synonyms: track / cover / cross / pass over / get over / get across / cut through / cut across
traverse (v.)
to cover or extend over an area or time period;
Rivers traverse the valley floor
Synonyms: cross / span / sweep
traverse (v.)
deny formally (an allegation of fact by the opposing party) in a legal suit;
Synonyms: deny
From wordnet.princeton.edu