Etymology
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transplant (v.)

mid-15c., from Late Latin transplantare "plant again in a different place," from Latin trans "across, beyond" (see trans-) + plantare "to plant" (see plant (n.)). Extended to people (1550s) and then to organs or tissue (1786). Related: Transplanted; transplanting. An earlier verb was overplaunten "to transplant" (a tree), late 14c.

transplant (n.)

1756, in reference to plants, from transplant (v.); in reference to surgical transplanting of human organs or tissue it is first recorded 1951, but not in widespread use until Christiaan Barnard performed the world's first successful heart transplant in 1967 at Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa. Meaning "person not native to his place of residence" is recorded from 1961.

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Definitions of transplant
1
transplant (v.)
lift and reset in another soil or situation;
Synonyms: transfer
transplant (v.)
be transplantable;
These delicate plants do not transplant easily
transplant (v.)
place the organ of a donor into the body of a recipient;
Synonyms: graft
transplant (v.)
transfer from one place or period to another;
The ancient Greek story was transplanted into Modern America
Synonyms: transfer / transpose
2
transplant (n.)
(surgery) tissue or organ transplanted from a donor to a recipient; in some cases the patient can be both donor and recipient;
Synonyms: graft
transplant (n.)
an operation moving an organ from one organism (the donor) to another (the recipient);
he had a kidney transplant
a child had a multiple organ transplant two months ago
Synonyms: transplantation / organ transplant
transplant (n.)
the act of removing something from one location and introducing it in another location;
the transplant did not flower until the second year
too frequent transplanting is not good for families
Synonyms: transplantation / transplanting
From wordnet.princeton.edu