Etymology
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transgression (n.)

late 14c., from Old French transgression "transgression," particularly that relating to Adam and the Fall (12c.), from Late Latin transgressionem (nominative transgressio) "a transgression of the law," in classical Latin, "a going over, a going across," noun of action from transgressus, past participle of transgredi "step across, step over; climb over, pass, go beyond," from trans "across, beyond" (see trans-) + gradi (past participle gressus) "to walk, go" (from PIE root *ghredh- "to walk, go"). Geological sense is from 1882.

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Definitions of transgression

transgression (n.)
the act of transgressing; the violation of a law or a duty or moral principle;
the boy was punished for the transgressions of his father
Synonyms: evildoing
transgression (n.)
the spreading of the sea over land as evidenced by the deposition of marine strata over terrestrial strata;
transgression (n.)
the action of going beyond or overstepping some boundary or limit;
From wordnet.princeton.edu