Etymology
Advertisement

tincture (n.)

c. 1400, "a coloring, dye," from Latin tinctura "act of dyeing or tingeing," from tinctus "dye," past participle of tingere "to tinge, dye, soak in color," originally merely "to moisten, wet, soak," from PIE root *teng- "to soak" (source also of Old High German dunkon "to soak," Greek tengein "to moisten"). Meaning "solution of medicine in a mixture of alcohol" is first recorded 1640s. The verb is recorded from 1610s. Related: Tinctured.

Others are reading

Advertisement
Advertisement
Definitions of tincture
1
tincture (n.)
a substance that colors or dyes;
tincture (n.)
an indication that something has been present;
a tincture of condescension
Synonyms: trace / vestige / shadow
tincture (n.)
a quality of a given color that differs slightly from another color;
Synonyms: shade / tint / tone
tincture (n.)
(pharmacology) a medicine consisting of an extract in an alcohol solution;
2
tincture (v.)
fill, as with a certain quality;
The heavy traffic tinctures the air with carbon monoxide
Synonyms: impregnate / infuse / instill
tincture (v.)
stain or tinge with a slight amount of a color;
The sky was tinctured red
From wordnet.princeton.edu