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tide (n.)

Old English tīd "point or portion of time, due time, period, season; feast-day, canonical hour," from Proto-Germanic *tīdi- "division of time" (source also of Old Saxon tid, Dutch tijd, Old High German zit, German Zeit "time"), from PIE *di-ti- "division, division of time," suffixed form of root *da- "to divide."

Meaning "rise and fall of the sea" (mid-14c.) probably is via notion of "fixed time," specifically "time of high water;" either a native evolution or from Middle Low German getide (compare Middle Dutch tijd, Dutch tij, German Gezeiten "flood tide, tide of the sea"). Old English seems to have had no specific word for this, using flod and ebba to refer to the rise and fall. Old English heahtid "high tide" meant "festival, high day."

tide (v.)

"to carry (as the tide does)," 1620s, from tide (n.). Usually with over. Earlier it meant "to happen" (Old English; see tidings). Related: Tided; tiding.

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Definitions of tide from WordNet
1
tide (v.)
rise or move forward;
Synonyms: surge
tide (v.)
cause to float with the tide;
tide (v.)
be carried with the tide;
2
tide (n.)
the periodic rise and fall of the sea level under the gravitational pull of the moon;
tide (n.)
something that may increase or decrease (like the tides of the sea);
a rising tide of popular interest
tide (n.)
there are usually two high and two low tides each day;
Synonyms: lunar time period
From wordnet.princeton.edu