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thunder (n.)

mid-13c., from Old English þunor "thunder, thunderclap; the god Thor," from Proto-Germanic *thunraz (source also of Old Norse þorr, Old Frisian thuner, Middle Dutch donre, Dutch donder, Old High German donar, German Donner "thunder"), from PIE *(s)tene- "to resound, thunder" (source also of Sanskrit tanayitnuh "thundering," Persian tundar "thunder," Latin tonare "to thunder"). Swedish tordön is literally "Thor's din." The unetymological -d- also is found in Dutch and Icelandic versions of the word (compare sound (n.1)). Thunder-stick, imagined word used by primitive peoples for "gun," attested from 1904.

thunder (v.)

13c., from Old English þunrian, from the source of thunder (n.). Figurative sense of "to speak loudly, threateningly, or bombastically" is recorded from mid-14c. Related: Thundered; thundering. Compare Dutch donderen, German donnern.

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Definitions of thunder from WordNet
1
thunder (v.)
move fast, noisily, and heavily;
The bus thundered down the road
thunder (v.)
utter words loudly and forcefully;
Synonyms: roar
thunder (v.)
be the case that thunder is being heard;
Whenever it thunders, my dog crawls under the bed
Synonyms: boom
thunder (v.)
to make or produce a loud noise;
The river thundered below
2
thunder (n.)
a deep prolonged loud noise;
Synonyms: boom / roar / roaring
thunder (n.)
a booming or crashing noise caused by air expanding along the path of a bolt of lightning;
thunder (n.)
street names for heroin;
Synonyms: big H / hell dust / nose drops / smack / skag / scag
From wordnet.princeton.edu