Etymology
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thrill (v.)

early 14c., "to pierce, penetrate," metathesis of Old English þyrlian "to perforate, pierce," from þyrel "hole" (in Middle English, also "nostril"), from þurh "through" (compare Middle High German dürchel "pierced, perforated;" from PIE root *tere- (2) "cross over, pass through, overcome") + -el. Meaning "give a shivering, exciting feeling" is first recorded 1590s, via metaphoric notion of "pierce with emotion." Related: Thrilled; thrilling.

thrill (n.)

"a shivering, exciting feeling," 1670s, from thrill (v.). Meaning "a thrilling experience" is attested from 1936.

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Definitions of thrill
1
thrill (v.)
cause to be thrilled by some perceptual input;
The men were thrilled by a loud whistle blow
thrill (v.)
feel sudden intense sensation or emotion;
he was thrilled by the speed and the roar of the engine
Synonyms: tickle / vibrate
thrill (v.)
tremble convulsively, as from fear or excitement;
Synonyms: shudder / shiver / throb
thrill (v.)
fill with sublime emotion;
The children were thrilled at the prospect of going to the movies
Synonyms: exhilarate / tickle pink / inebriate / exalt / beatify
2
thrill (n.)
the swift release of a store of affective force;
Synonyms: bang / boot / charge / rush / flush / kick
thrill (n.)
an almost pleasurable sensation of fright;
Synonyms: frisson / shiver / chill / quiver / shudder / tingle
thrill (n.)
something that causes you to experience a sudden intense feeling or sensation;
the thrills of space travel
From wordnet.princeton.edu