Etymology
Advertisement

Words related to terminus

conterminous (adj.)

"having the same limit, touching at the boundary," 1670s, from Latin conterminus "bordering upon, having a common boundary," from assimilated form of com "together, with" (see con-) + terminus "end, boundary line" (see terminus). Related: Conterminously; conterminousness.

Advertisement
determinable (adj.)

c. 1400, "definite;" mid-15c., in law, "capable of being decided or settled;" from Old French determinable, from Late Latin determinabilis "that has an end," from stem of Latin determinare "to enclose, bound, set limits to," from de "off" (see de-) + terminare "to mark the end or boundary," from terminus "end, limit" (see terminus). Meaning "capable of being ascertained" is from 1650s. Related: Determinability.

determinant 

c. 1600 (adj.), "serving to determine;" 1680s (n.), "that which fixes, defines, or establishes (something);" from Latin determinantem (nominative determinans), present participle of determinare "to enclose, bound, set limits to," from de "off" (see de-) + terminare "to mark the end or boundary," from terminus "end, limit" (see terminus).

determine (v.)

late 14c., determinen, "to settle, decide upon; state definitely; fix the bounds of; limit in time or extent," also "come to a firm decision or definite intention" (to do something), from Old French determiner (12c.) and directly from Latin determinare "to enclose, bound, set limits to," from de "off" (see de-) + terminare "to mark the end or boundary," from terminus "end, limit" (see terminus).

Meaning "render judgment" is from early 15c. Sense of "give direction or tendency to" is from early 15c. Meaning "to find (as the solution of a problem)" is from 1640s. Related: Determined; determining; determiner.

exterminate (v.)

1540s, "drive away," from Latin exterminatus, past participle of exterminare "drive out, expel, put aside, drive beyond boundaries," also, in Late Latin "destroy," from phrase ex termine "beyond the boundary," from ex "out of" (see ex-) + termine, ablative of termen "boundary, limit, end" (see terminus).

Meaning "destroy utterly" is from 1640s in English, a sense found in equivalent words in French and in the Vulgate; earlier in this sense was extermine (mid-15c.). Related: Exterminated; exterminating.

extermination (n.)

mid-15c., exterminacioun, "repulsion;" 1540s, "utter destruction, eradication," from Latin exterminationem (nominative exterminatio) "ejection, banishment," noun of action from past-participle stem of exterminare "drive out, expel, put aside, drive beyond boundaries," also, in Late Latin "destroy," from phrase ex termine "beyond the boundary," from ex "out of" (see ex-) + termine, ablative of termen "boundary, limit, end" (see terminus).

interminable (adj.)
late 14c., from Old French interminable (14c.) or directly from Late Latin interminabilis "endless," from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + terminabilis, from terminare "to limit, set bounds, end" (see terminus (adj.)). Related: Interminably.
interminate (adj.)
1530s, from Latin interminatus "unbounded, endless," from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + terminalis "pertaining to a boundary or end, final," from terminus "end, boundary line" (see terminus).
term (n.)
c. 1200, terme "limit in time, set or appointed period," from Old French terme "limit of time or place, date, appointed time, duration" (11c.), from Latin terminus "end, boundary line," in Medieval Latin "expression, definition," related to termen "boundary, end" (see terminus). Old English had termen "term, end," from Latin. Sense of "period of time during which something happens" first recorded c. 1300, especially of a school or law court session (mid-15c.).

The meaning "word or phrase used in a limited or precise sense" is first recorded late 14c., from Medieval Latin use of terminus to render Greek horos "boundary," employed in mathematics and logic. Hence in terms of "in the language or phraseology peculiar to." Meaning "completion of the period of pregnancy" is from 1844. Term-paper in U.S. educational sense is recorded from 1931.
terminal (adj.)
mid-15c., "relating to or marking boundaries," from Latin terminalis "pertaining to a boundary or end, final," from terminus "end, boundary line" (see terminus). Meaning "fatal" (terminal illness) is first recorded 1891. Sense of "situated at the extreme end" (of something) is from 1805. Slang meaning "extreme" first recorded 1983. Related: Termninally.