Etymology
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tension (n.)

1530s, "a stretched condition," from French tension (16c.) or directly from Latin tensionem (nominative tensio) "a stretching" (in Medieval Latin "a struggle, contest"), noun of state from tensus, past participle of tendere "to stretch," from PIE root *ten- "to stretch." The sense of "nervous strain" is first recorded 1763. The meaning "stress along lines of electromotive force" (as in high-tension wires) is recorded from 1785.

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Definitions of tension

tension (n.)
(psychology) a state of mental or emotional strain or suspense;
he suffered from fatigue and emotional tension
Synonyms: tenseness / stress
tension (n.)
the physical condition of being stretched or strained;
it places great tension on the leg muscles
Synonyms: tensity / tenseness / tautness
tension (n.)
a balance between and interplay of opposing elements or tendencies (especially in art or literature);
there is a tension between these approaches to understanding history
there is a tension created between narrative time and movie time
tension (n.)
(physics) a stress that produces an elongation of an elastic physical body;
the direction of maximum tension moves asymptotically toward the direction of the shear
tension (n.)
feelings of hostility that are not manifest;
the diplomats' first concern was to reduce international tensions
Synonyms: latent hostility
tension (n.)
the action of stretching something tight;
tension holds the belt in the pulleys
From wordnet.princeton.edu