Etymology
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Words related to technic

techno- 

word-forming element meaning "art, craft, skill," later "technical, technology," from Latinized form of Greek tekhno-, combining form of tekhnē "art, skill, craft in work; method, system, an art, a system or method of making or doing," from PIE *teks-na- "craft" (of weaving or fabricating), from suffixed form of root *teks- "to weave," also "to fabricate."

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technique (n.)

1817, at first especially in criticism of art and music, from French technique "formal practical details in artistic expression" (18c.), noun use of technique (adj.) "of art, technical," from Greek tekhnikos "pertaining to art," from tekhnē "art, skill, craft in work" (see techno-).

atechnic (adj.)
"not having technical knowledge," 1869, from a- (3) "not, without" + technic.
technical (adj.)

1610s, "skilled in a particular art or subject," formed in English from technic + -al (1), or in part from Greek tekhnikos "of art; systematic," in reference to persons "skillful, artistic," from tekhnē "art, skill, craft" (see techno-).

The sense narrowed to "having to do with the mechanical arts" (1727). Basketball technical foul (one which does not involve contact between opponents) is recorded from 1934. Boxing technical knock-out (one in which the loser is not knocked out) is recorded from 1921; abbreviation TKO is from 1940s. Technical difficulty is from 1805.

technician (n.)
1833, "person expert in the technicalities of some question," from technic + -ian. Meaning "person skilled in mechanical arts" is recorded from 1939.
technics (n.)
1850, from technic; also see -ics. Technicist is attested from 1876.