Etymology
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supple (adj.)

c. 1300, "soft, tender," from Old French souple, sople "pliant, flexible; humble, submissive" (12c.), from Gallo-Roman *supples, from Latin supplex "submissive, humbly begging, beseeching, kneeling in entreaty, suppliant," literally "bending, kneeling down," perhaps an altered form of *supplacos "humbly pleading, appeasing," from sub "under" (see sub-) + placare "to calm, appease, quiet, soothe, assuage," causative of placere "to please" (see please, and compare supplication).

Meaning "pliant" is from late 14c.; figurative sense of "artfully obsequious, capable of adapting oneself to the wishes and opinions of others" is from c. 1600. Supple-chapped (c. 1600) was used of a flatterer. Related: Suppleness.

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Definitions of supple
1
supple (adj.)
gracefully thin and bending and moving with ease;
Synonyms: lissome / lissom / lithe / lithesome / sinuous
supple (adj.)
(used of e.g. personality traits) readily adaptable;
a supple mind
Synonyms: limber
supple (adj.)
(used of persons' bodies) capable of moving or bending freely;
Synonyms: limber
2
supple (v.)
make pliant and flexible;
These boots are not yet suppled by frequent use
From wordnet.princeton.edu