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sun (n.)

Old English sunne "the sun," from Proto-Germanic *sunno (source also of Old Norse, Old Saxon, Old High German sunna, Middle Dutch sonne, Dutch zon, German Sonne, Gothic sunno "the sun"), from PIE *s(u)wen-, alternative form of root *sawel- "the sun."

Old English sunne was feminine (as generally in Germanic), and the fem. pronoun was used in English until 16c.; since then masc. has prevailed. The empire on which the sun never sets (1630) originally was the Spanish, later the British. To have one's place in the sun (1680s) is from Pascal's "Pensées"; the German imperial foreign policy sense (1897) is from a speech by von Bülow.

sun (v.)

1510s, "to set something in the sun," from sun (n.). Intransitive meaning "expose oneself to the sun" is recorded from c. 1600. Sun-bathing is attested from c. 1600.

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Definitions of sun from WordNet
1
sun (n.)
the star that is the source of light and heat for the planets in the solar system;
the sun contains 99.85% of the mass in the solar system
sun (n.)
the rays of the sun;
the shingles were weathered by the sun and wind
Synonyms: sunlight / sunshine
sun (n.)
a person considered as a source of warmth or energy or glory etc;
sun (n.)
any star around which a planetary system revolves;
2
sun (v.)
expose one's body to the sun;
Synonyms: sunbathe
sun (v.)
expose to the rays of the sun or affect by exposure to the sun;
These herbs suffer when sunned
Synonyms: insolate / solarize / solarise
3
Sun (n.)
the star that is the source of light and heat for the planets in the solar system;
the sun contains 99.85% of the mass in the solar system
Sun (n.)
first day of the week; observed as a day of rest and worship by most Christians;
Synonyms: Sunday / Lord's Day / Dominicus
From wordnet.princeton.edu