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summer (n.1)

"hot season of the year," Old English sumor "summer," from Proto-Germanic *sumra- (source also of Old Saxon, Old Norse, Old High German sumar, Old Frisian sumur, Middle Dutch somer, Dutch zomer, German Sommer), from PIE root *sem- (2) "summer" (source also of Sanskrit sama "season, half-year," Avestan hama "in summer," Armenian amarn "summer," Old Irish sam, Old Welsh ham, Welsh haf "summer").

As an adjective from c. 1300. Summer camp as an institution for youth is attested from 1886; summer resort is from 1823; summer school first recorded 1810; theatrical summer stock is attested from 1941 (see stock (n.2)). Old Norse sumarsdag, first day of summer, was the Thursday that fell between April 9 and 15.

summer (n.2)

"horizontal bearing beam," late 13c., from Anglo-French sumer, Old French somier "main beam," originally "pack horse," from Vulgar Latin *saumarius, from Late Latin sagmarius "pack horse," from sagma "packsaddle" (see sumpter).

summer (v.)

"to pass the summer," mid-15c., from summer (n.1). Related: Summered; summering.

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Definitions of summer from WordNet
1
summer (n.)
the warmest season of the year; in the northern hemisphere it extends from the summer solstice to the autumnal equinox;
they spent a lazy summer at the shore
Synonyms: summertime
summer (n.)
the period of finest development, happiness, or beauty;
the golden summer of his life
2
summer (v.)
spend the summer;
We summered in Kashmir
From wordnet.princeton.edu