Etymology
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stub (n.)

Old English stybb "stump of a tree," from Proto-Germanic *stubjaz (source also of Middle Dutch stubbe, Old Norse stubbr), from PIE root *(s)teu- (1) "to push, stick, knock, beat" (see steep (adj.)). Extended 14c. to other short, thick, protruding things. Meaning "remaining part of something partially consumed" is from 1520s.

stub (v.)

mid-15c., "dig up stumps, dig up by the roots," from stub (n.). The sens of "strike (one's toe) against" something projecting from a surface is first recorded 1848. Meaning "to extinguish a cigarette" is from 1927. Related: Stubbed; stubbing.

updated on December 11, 2013

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Definitions of stub from WordNet
1
stub (n.)
a short piece remaining on a trunk or stem where a branch is lost;
stub (n.)
a small piece;
a stub of a pencil
Synonyms: nub
stub (n.)
a torn part of a ticket returned to the holder as a receipt;
Synonyms: ticket stub
stub (n.)
the part of a check that is retained as a record;
Synonyms: check stub / counterfoil
stub (n.)
the small unused part of something (especially the end of a cigarette that is left after smoking);
Synonyms: butt
2
stub (v.)
pull up (weeds) by their roots;
stub (v.)
extinguish by crushing;
stub out your cigarette now
stub (v.)
clear of weeds by uprooting them;
stub a field
stub (v.)
strike (one's toe) accidentally against an object;
She stubbed her toe in the dark and now it's broken
Etymologies are not definitions. From wordnet.princeton.edu, not affiliated with etymonline.