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stress (n.)

c. 1300, "hardship, adversity, force, pressure," in part a shortening of Middle English distress (n.); in part from Old French estrece "narrowness, oppression," from Vulgar Latin *strictia, from Latin strictus "tight, compressed, drawn together," past participle of stringere "draw tight" (see strain (v.)). Meaning "physical strain on a material object" is from mid-15c. As an abstract force in mechanics from 1855. The purely psychological sense is attested from 1955.

stress (v.)

c. 1300, stressen, "to subject (someone) to force or compulsion," a short form of distress (v.), or else from Old French estrecier, estrescer, from Vulgar Latin *strictiare, from Latin stringere "draw tight," which also is the source of stress (n.). The figurative meaning "put emphasis on" is first recorded 1896, from notion of laying pressure on something by relying on it. Related: Stressed; stressing.

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Definitions of stress from WordNet
1
stress (n.)
the relative prominence of a syllable or musical note (especially with regard to stress or pitch);
he put the stress on the wrong syllable
Synonyms: emphasis / accent
stress (n.)
(psychology) a state of mental or emotional strain or suspense;
stress is a vasoconstrictor
Synonyms: tension / tenseness
stress (n.)
special emphasis attached to something;
the stress was more on accuracy than on speed
Synonyms: focus
stress (n.)
difficulty that causes worry or emotional tension; "he presided over the economy during the period of the greatest stress and danger"- R.J.Samuelson;
Synonyms: strain
stress (n.)
(physics) force that produces strain on a physical body;
the intensity of stress is expressed in units of force divided by units of area
2
stress (v.)
to stress, single out as important;
stress (v.)
put stress on; utter with an accent;
Synonyms: accent / accentuate
stress (v.)
test the limits of;
Synonyms: try / strain
From wordnet.princeton.edu