Etymology
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strap (n.)

1610s, "band of leather," from Scottish and/or nautical variant of strope "loop or strap on a harness" (mid-14c.), probably from Old French estrop "strap," from Latin stroppus "strap, band," perhaps via Etruscan, ultimately from Greek strophos "twisted band; a cord, rope," from strephein "to turn" (from PIE root *streb(h)- "to wind, turn"). Old English stropp, Dutch strop "halter" also are borrowed from Latin, and the Old English word might be the source of the modern one. Slang meaning "credit" is from 1828.

strap (v.)

"to fasten or secure with a strap," 1711, from strap (n.). Slang adjective strapped "short of money" is from 1857, from strap (n.) in the old sense of "financial credit" (1828). Meaning "to beat with a strap" is from 1735. Related: Strapped; strapping.

updated on July 20, 2017

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Definitions of strap from WordNet
1
strap (v.)
tie with a strap;
strap (v.)
beat severely with a whip or rod;
Synonyms: flog / welt / whip / lather / lash / slash / trounce
strap (v.)
sharpen with a strap;
strap a razor
strap (v.)
secure (a sprained joint) with a strap;
2
strap (n.)
an elongated leather strip (or a strip of similar material) for binding things together or holding something in position;
strap (n.)
hanger consisting of a loop of leather suspended from the ceiling of a bus or train; passengers hold onto it;
strap (n.)
a band that goes over the shoulder and supports a garment or bag;
Synonyms: shoulder strap
strap (n.)
whip consisting of a strip of leather used in flogging;
Etymologies are not definitions. From wordnet.princeton.edu, not affiliated with etymonline.