Etymology
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strangle (v.)

late 13c., from Old French estrangler "choke, suffocate, throttle" (Modern French étrangler), from Latin strangulare "to choke, stifle, check, constrain," from Greek strangalan "to choke, twist," from strangale "a halter, cord, lace," related to strangos "twisted," from PIE root *strenk- "tight, narrow; pull tight, twist" (see string (n.)). Related: Strangled; strangling.

updated on December 07, 2013

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Definitions of strangle from WordNet

strangle (v.)
kill by squeezing the throat of so as to cut off the air;
Synonyms: strangulate / throttle
strangle (v.)
suppress in order to conceal or hide;
strangle a laugh
Synonyms: smother / stifle / muffle / repress
strangle (v.)
die from strangulation;
strangle (v.)
prevent the progress or free movement of;
the imperialist nation wanted to strangle the free trade between the two small countries
Synonyms: hamper / halter / cramp
strangle (v.)
constrict (someone's) throat and keep from breathing;
Synonyms: choke
strangle (v.)
struggle for breath; have insufficient oxygen intake;
Synonyms: gag / choke / suffocate
Etymologies are not definitions. From wordnet.princeton.edu, not affiliated with etymonline.