Etymology
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stout (adj.)

c. 1300, "proud, valiant, strong," from Old French estout "brave, fierce, proud," earlier estolt "strong," from a Germanic source from West Germanic *stult- "proud, stately, strutting" (source also of Middle Low German stolt "stately, proud," German stolz "proud, haughty, arrogant, stately"), from PIE root *stel- "to put, stand, put in order," with derivatives referring to a standing object or place.

Meaning "strong in body, powerfully built" is attested from late 14c., but has been displaced by the (often euphemistic) meaning "thick-bodied, fat and large, bulky in figure," which is first recorded 1804. Original sense preserved in figurative phrase stout-hearted (1550s). Related: Stoutly; stoutness.

stout (n.)

1670s, "strong beer or ale," from stout (adj.). Later especially, and now usually, "porter of extra strength" (by 1762).

updated on August 16, 2018

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Definitions of stout from WordNet
1
stout (adj.)
dependable;
stout hearts
Synonyms: stalwart
stout (adj.)
euphemisms for `fat';
men are portly and women are stout
Synonyms: portly
stout (adj.)
having rugged physical strength; inured to fatigue or hardships;
stout seamen
Synonyms: hardy / stalwart / sturdy
2
stout (n.)
a strong very dark heavy-bodied ale made from pale malt and roasted unmalted barley and (often) caramel malt with hops;
stout (n.)
a garment size for a large or heavy person;
From wordnet.princeton.edu, not affiliated with etymonline.