Etymology
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storm (n.)

Old English storm "violent disturbance of the atmosphere, tempest; onrush, attack, tumult; disturbance," from Proto-Germanic *sturmaz "storm" (source also of Old Norse stormr, Old Saxon, Middle Low German, Middle Dutch, Dutch storm, Old High German sturm, German Sturm), from PIE *stur-mo-, from root *(s)twer- (1) "to turn, whirl." Old French estour "onset, tumult," Italian stormo "a fight" are Germanic loan-words. Figurative (non-meteorological) sense was in late Old English.

Storm-wind is from 1798. Storm-door first recorded 1872; storm-water is from 1847; storm-window is attested from 1824. Storm surge attested from 1872. Adverbial phrase _______ up a storm is from 1946.

storm (v.)

of the wind, "to rage, be violent," c. 1400, considered to be from storm (n.). Old English had styrman, cognate with Dutch stormen, Old High German sturman, German stürmen, Danish storme, Military sense "attack (a place) by scaling walls and forcing gates" (1640s) first attested in writings of Oliver Cromwell. Related: Stormed; storming. Italian stormire "make a noise" is from Germanic.

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Definitions of storm
1
storm (v.)
behave violently, as if in state of a great anger;
Synonyms: ramp / rage
storm (v.)
take by force;
Synonyms: force
storm (v.)
rain, hail, or snow hard and be very windy, often with thunder or lightning;
If it storms, we'll need shelter
storm (v.)
blow hard;
It was storming all night
storm (v.)
attack by storm; attack suddenly;
Synonyms: surprise
2
storm (n.)
a violent weather condition with winds 64-72 knots (11 on the Beaufort scale) and precipitation and thunder and lightning;
Synonyms: violent storm
storm (n.)
a violent commotion or disturbance;
the storms that had characterized their relationship had died away
Synonyms: tempest
storm (n.)
a direct and violent assault on a stronghold;
From wordnet.princeton.edu