Etymology
Advertisement

stool (n.)

Old English stol "seat for one person," from Proto-Germanic *stōla- (source also of Old Frisian stol, Old Norse stoll, Old High German stuol, German Stuhl "seat," Gothic stols "high seat, throne"), from PIE *sta-lo-, locative of root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm."(source also of Lithuanian pa-stolas "stand," Old Church Slavonic stolu "stool").

Originally used of thrones (as in cynestol "royal seat, throne"); decline in sense began with adoption of chair (n.) from French, which relegated stool to small seats without arms or backs, then to "privy" (early 15c.) and thence to "bowel movement" (1530s).

Others are reading

Advertisement
Advertisement
Definitions of stool
1
stool (v.)
lure with a stool, as of wild fowl;
stool (v.)
react to a decoy, of wildfowl;
stool (v.)
grow shoots in the form of stools or tillers;
Synonyms: tiller
stool (v.)
have a bowel movement;
Synonyms: defecate / shit / take a shit / take a crap / ca-ca / crap / make
2
stool (n.)
a simple seat without a back or arms;
stool (n.)
solid excretory product evacuated from the bowels;
Synonyms: fecal matter / faecal matter / feces / faeces / bm / ordure / dejection
stool (n.)
(forestry) the stump of a tree that has been felled or headed for the production of saplings;
stool (n.)
a plumbing fixture for defecation and urination;
Synonyms: toilet / can / commode / crapper / pot / potty / throne
From wordnet.princeton.edu