Etymology
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Words related to stone

stoned (adj.)
1510s, "having or containing stones," past-participle adjective from stone (v.). From 1728 as "deprived of stones." Slang meaning "drunk; intoxicated with narcotics" is from 1930s. Stoner is from mid-14c. as "one who stones;" mid-1960s as "stuporous person."
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Athelstan 
masc. proper name, Old English Æðelstane, literally "noble stone;" see atheling + stone (n.).
bakestone (n.)
"flat stone used as a griddle," c. 1200, from bake (v.) + stone (n.).
birthstone (n.)
1874, from birth (n.) + stone (n.).
brimstone (n.)

"sulfur in a solidified state," Old English brynstan, from brin- stem of brinnen "to burn" (from Proto-Germanic *brennan "to burn," from PIE root *gwher- "to heat, warm") + stan (see stone (n.)). In Middle English the first element also recorded as brem-, brom-, brum-, bren-, brin-, bron-, brun-, bern-, born-, burn-, burned-, and burnt-. Formerly "the mineral sulfur," now restricted to biblical usage.

The Lord reynede vpon Sodom and Gomor brenstoon and fier. [Wycliff's rendition (1382) of Genesis xix.24]

The Old Norse cognate compound brennusteinn meant "amber," as does German Bernstein.

brownstone (n.)

"dark sandstone," 1849, from brown (adj.) + stone (n.). It was quarried extensively from Triassic deposits in the U.S. Northeast and much-used there as a building stone. As "house or building fronted with brownstone" from 1932.

ONLY a few years ago to live in a brownstone front was a badge of distinction in Manhattan. Novelists always had their rich housed in brownstone fronts. There was magic in the name a quarter of a century ago. The brownstone front was the home of the merchant prince. The material had to be mined on the western plains of New Jersey and teamed and lightered to New York at a great cost in those days. O.O. Mclntyre writes there are blocks and blocks of them above Forty-second street, but of late they have fallen into decay. The advent of the luxurious apartment house put them in the shade. Now they are being torn down with ruthless abandon and the last shred of dignity has vanished. [The American Architect, Dec. 8, 1920]
capstone (n.)
also cap-stone, topmost or finishing stone in a construction, 1680s, from cap + stone (n.). Earliest use is figurative.
clingstone (n.)

"fruit (generally a peach) having the pulp adhering firmly to the stone," 1722, from cling (v.) + stone (n.). Also as an adjective.

cobblestone (n.)

"small, roundish, water-worn stone suitable for paving," late 14c., kobilstane; see cobble (n.) + stone (n.). Also in Middle English "a cherry-stone or pit."

cornerstone (n.)

also corner-stone, late 13c., "stone which lies at the corner of two walls and unites them" (often the starting point of a building), hence, figuratively, "that on which anything is founded;" from corner (n.) + stone (n.). The figurative use is biblical (Isaiah xxvii.16, Job xxxviii.6, Ephesians ii.20), rendering Latin lapis angularis.

In U.S. history, Alexander H. Stephens's Cornerstone speech explaining the new Confederate constitution was given at Savannah, Georgia, March 21, 1861. The image is older in U.S. political discourse and originally referred to the federal union.

I endorse without reserve the much abused sentiment of Governor M'Duffie, that "Slavery is the corner-stone of our republican edifice;" while I repudiate, as ridiculously absurd, that much lauded but nowhere accredited dogma of Mr. Jefferson, that "all men are born equal." No society has ever yet existed, and I have already incidentally quoted the highest authority to show that none ever will exist, without a natural variety of classes. [James H. Hammond, "Letter to an English Abolitionist" 1845]