Etymology
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spur (n.)

Old English spura, spora "metal implement worn on the heel to goad a horse" (related to spurnan "to kick"), from Proto-Germanic *spuron (source also of Old Norse spori, Middle Dutch spore, Dutch spoor, Old High German sporo, German Sporn "spur"), from PIE *spere- "ankle" (see spurn). Related to Dutch spoor, Old English spor "track, footprint, trace."

Generalized sense of "anything that urges on, stimulus," is from late 14c. As a sharp projection on the leg of a cock, from 1540s. Meaning "a ridge projecting off a mountain mass" is recorded from 1650s. Of railway lines from 1837. "Widely extended senses ... are characteristic of a horsey race" [Weekley]. Expression on the spur of the moment (1801) preserves archaic phrase on the spur "in great haste" (1520s). To win one's spurs is to gain knighthood by some valorous act, gilded spurs being the distinctive mark of a knight.

spur (v.)

c. 1200, from spur (n.). Figurative use from c. 1500. Related: Spurred; spurring. Old English had spyrian, but it meant "follow the track of, track down, investigate."

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Definitions of spur
1
spur (v.)
incite or stimulate;
The Academy was formed to spur research
spur (v.)
give heart or courage to;
Synonyms: goad
spur (v.)
strike with a spur;
spur (v.)
goad with spurs;
the rider spurred his horse
spur (v.)
equip with spurs;
spur horses
2
spur (n.)
a verbalization that encourages you to attempt something;
Synonyms: goad / goading / prod / prodding / urging / spurring
spur (n.)
any sharply pointed projection;
Synonyms: spine / acantha
spur (n.)
tubular extension at the base of the corolla in some flowers;
spur (n.)
a sharp prod fixed to a rider's heel and used to urge a horse onward;
cowboys know not to squat with their spurs on
Synonyms: gad
spur (n.)
a railway line connected to a trunk line;
Synonyms: branch line / spur track
From wordnet.princeton.edu