Etymology
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spice (n.)

c. 1200, "something added to food or drink to enhance the flavor, vegetable substance aromatic or pungent to the taste," also "a spice used as a medication or an alchemical ingredient," from Old French espice (Modern French épice), from Late Latin species (plural) "spices, goods, wares," in classical Latin "kind, sort" (see species). From c. 1300 as "an aromatic spice," also "spices as commodities;" from early 14c. as "a spice-bearing plant." Figurative sense of "attractive or enjoyable variation" is from 13c.; that of "slight touch or trace of something" is recorded from 1530s. Meaning "specimen, sample" is from 1790. Early druggists recognized four "types" of spices: saffron, clove, cinnamon, nutmeg.

spice (v.)

"to season with spices," early 14c. (implied in spiced), from spice (n.), or from Old French espicier, from the French noun. Figurative sense of "to vary, diversify" is from 1520s.

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Definitions of spice
1
spice (n.)
aromatic substances of vegetable origin used as a preservative;
spice (n.)
any of a variety of pungent aromatic vegetable substances used for flavoring food;
spice (n.)
the property of being seasoned with spice and so highly flavored;
Synonyms: spiciness / spicery
2
spice (v.)
make more interesting or flavorful;
Synonyms: spice up
spice (v.)
add herbs or spices to;
Synonyms: zest / spice up
From wordnet.princeton.edu