Etymology
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specific (adj.)

1630s, "having a special quality," from French spécifique and directly from Late Latin specificus "constituting a kind or sort" (in Medieval Latin "specific, particular"), from Latin species "kind, sort" (see species) +  -ficus "making, doing," from combining form of facere "to make." Earlier form was specifical (early 15c.). Meaning "definite, precise" first recorded 1740. Related: Specifically; specificness.

specific (n.)

"a specific quality or detail," 1690s, from specific (adj.).

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Definitions of specific
1
specific (adj.)
(sometimes followed by `to') applying to or characterized by or distinguishing something particular or special or unique;
demands specific to the job
a specific and detailed account of the accident
rules with specific application
specific (adj.)
stated explicitly or in detail;
needed a specific amount
specific (adj.)
relating to or distinguishing or constituting a taxonomic species;
specific characters
specific (adj.)
being or affecting a disease produced by a particular microorganism or condition; used also of stains or dyes used in making microscope slides;
quinine is highly specific for malaria
a specific stain is one having a specific affinity for particular structural elements
a specific remedy
2
specific (n.)
a fact about some part (as opposed to general);
Synonyms: particular
specific (n.)
a medicine that has a mitigating effect on a specific disease;
quinine is a specific for malaria
From wordnet.princeton.edu