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spar (n.1)

early 14c., "rafter;" late 14c., "stout pole," from or cognate with Middle Low German or Middle Dutch sparre, from Proto-Germanic *sparron (source also of Old English *spere "spear, lance," Old Norse sperra "rafter, beam," German Sparren "spar, rafter"), from PIE root *sper- (1) "spear, pole" (see spear (n.1)). Nautical use, in reference to one used as a mast, yard, boom, etc., dates from 1630s. Also borrowed in Old French as esparre, which might be the direct source of the English word.

spar (v.)

late 14c., "go quickly, rush, dart, spring;" c. 1400, "to strike or thrust," perhaps from French esparer "to kick" (Modern French éparer), from Italian sparare "to fling," from Latin ex- (see ex-) + parare "make ready, prepare," hence "ward off, parry" (from PIE root *pere- (1) "to produce, procure"). Etymologists consider a connection with spur unlikely. Used in 17c. in reference to preliminary actions in a cock fight; figurative sense of "to dispute, bandy with words" is from 1690s. Extension to humans, in a literal sense, with meaning "to engage in or practice boxing" is attested from 1755. Related: Sparred; sparring.

spar (n.2)

"crystalline mineral that breaks easily into fragments with smooth surfaces," 1580s, from Low German Spar, from Middle Low German *spar, *sper, cognate with Old English spær- in spærstan "gypsum."

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Definitions of spar from WordNet
1
spar (v.)
furnish with spars;
spar (v.)
fight with spurs;
the gamecocks were sparring
spar (v.)
box lightly;
spar (v.)
fight verbally;
They were sparring all night
2
spar (n.)
any of various nonmetallic minerals (calcite or feldspar) that are light in color and transparent or translucent and cleavable;
spar (n.)
a stout rounded pole of wood or metal used to support rigging;
spar (n.)
making the motions of attack and defense with the fists and arms; a part of training for a boxer;
Synonyms: sparring
From wordnet.princeton.edu