Etymology
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Words related to solicit

*sol- 

also solə-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "whole, well-kept." 

It forms all or part of: catholic; consolidate; consolidation; holism; holo-; holocaust; Holocene; hologram; holograph; insouciant; safe; safety; sage (n.1) kind of herb; salubrious; salutary; salute; salvage; salvific; salvo "simultaneous discharge of guns;" save (v.) "deliver from danger;" save (prep.) "except;" solder; soldier; solemn; solicit; solicitous; solid; solidarity; solidity; sou.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit sarvah "uninjured, intact, whole;" Avestan haurva- "uninjured, intact;" Old Persian haruva-; Greek holos "whole;" Latin salvus "uninjured, in good health, safe," salus "good health," solidus "solid;" Armenian olj "whole, healthy."  

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*keie- 

also keiə-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to set in motion."

It might form all or part of: behest; cinema; cinematography; citation; cite; excite; hest; hight; hyperkinetic; incite; kinase; kinematics; kinesics; kinesiology; kinesis; kinesthesia; kinesthetic; kinetic; kineto-; kino-; oscitant; recital; recitation; recite; resuscitate; solicit; solicitous; suscitate; telekinesis.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit cyavate "stirs himself, goes;" Greek kinein "to move, set in motion; change, stir up," kinymai "move myself;" Latin ciere (past participle citus, frequentative citare) "to set in motion, summon;" Gothic haitan "call, be called;" Old English hatan "command, call."  

insouciance (n.)
1820, from French insouciance "heedless indifference or unconcern," from insouciant "carelessness, thoughtlessness, heedlessness," from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + souciant "caring," present participle of soucier "to care," from Latin sollicitare "to agitate" (see solicit).
insouciant (adj.)
1828, from French insouciant "careless, thoughtless, heedless," from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + souciant "caring," present participle of soucier "to care," from Latin sollicitare "to agitate" (see solicit). Related: Insouciantly.
solicitate (v.)

1540s, from Latin solicitatus, past participle of sollicitare "to disturb, rouse, stimulate, provoke" (see solicit). Related: Solicitated; solicitating.

solicitation (n.)

late 15c., "management," from French solicitation and directly from Latin solicitationem (nominative solicitatio) "vexation, disturbance, instigation," noun of action from past-participle stem of solicitare "to disturb, rouse, stimulate, provoke"

(see solicit). Meaning "action of soliciting" is from 1520s. Specific sexual sense is from c. 1600.

solicitor (n.)

early 15c., solicitour, "one who urges," from Old French soliciteor. soliciteur, from soliciter (see solicit). Meaning "one who conducts matters on behalf of another" is from early 15c. As a name for a specific class of legal practitioners in Britain, it is attested from 1570s. Both the fem. forms, solicitress (1630s) and solicitrix (1610s), have been in the sexual sense, but the latter seems more common in non-pejorative use.

solicitous (adj.)
1560s, from Latin sollicitus "restless, uneasy, careful, full of anxiety" (see solicit). Related: Solicitously; solicitousness.
solicitude (n.)

early 15c., "diligence, industry, activity; anxiety, care, concern," from Old French solicitude (Modern French sollicitude), and directly from Latin sollicitudinem (nominative solicitudo) "anxiety, uneasiness of mind," noun of state from past-participle stem of solicitare (see solicit).

unsolicited (adj.)
1580s, "unpetitioned, not approached with a request," from un- (1) "not" + past participle of solicit (v.). Meaning "not asked for, unsought" is from 1680s.