Etymology
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Words related to soap

saponaceous (adj.)

"soapy, resembling soap," 1710, from Latin sapo, sapon (see soap (n.)) + -aceous. In mid-19c. jocular use for "slippery, unctuous" in figurative senses (1837). Related: Saponacity

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saponification (n.)

"conversion into soap," 1801, from French saponification, from saponifier, from Modern Latin saponificare, from sapon "soap" (see soap (n.)) + -ficare, combining form of Latin facere "to make" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put").

sebum (n.)
secretion of the sebaceous glands, 1728, from medical use of Latin sebum "sebum, suet, grease," probably related to sapo "soap" (see soap (n.)).
seep (v.)
1790, variant of sipe (c. 1500), possibly from Old English sipian "to seep," from Proto-Germanic *sip- (source also of Middle High German sifen, Dutch sijpelen "to ooze"), from PIE root *seib- "to pour out, drip, trickle" (see soap (n.)). Related: Seeped; seeping.
sieve (n.)

"instrument for separating the finer from the coarser parts of disintegrated matter by shaking it so as to force the former through meshes too small for the latter to pass," Old English sife, from Proto-Germanic *sib (source also of Middle Dutch seve, Dutch zeef, Old High German sib, German Sieb), from PIE *seib- "to pour out, sieve, drip, trickle" (see soap (n.)). Related to sift. The Sieve of Eratosthenes (1803) is a contrivance for finding prime numbers. Sieve and shears formerly were used in divination.

soap-box (n.)
also soapbox, 1650s, "box for holding soap," later especially a wooden crate in which soap may be packed; from soap (n.) + box (n.). Typical of a makeshift stand for a public orator at least since 1907. Also used by children to make racing carts, as in soap-box derby, annual race in Dayton, Ohio, which dates to 1933.
soap-bubble (n.)
1800, from soap (n.) + bubble (n.).
soap-dish (n.)
1835 as a dish for a bar of soap; 1814 as a holder for shaving-soap, from soap (n.) + dish (n.).
soapstone (n.)
type of talc, 1680s, from soap (n.) + stone (n.). So called because it is occasionally used for cleaning.
soapy (adj.)
c. 1600, from soap (n.) + -y (2). Related: Soapily; soapiness.